Panel on the Purdue Pharma Bankruptcy

Anthony Casey, professor of law at the University of Chicago; William Organek, assistant professor of law at the Baruch College Zicklin School of Business; and Lindsey Simon, associate professor of law at Emory University join the Business Scholarship Podcast to discuss the legal, commercial, and social issues at play in the Supreme Court’s upcoming Harrington v. Purdue Pharma L.P. bankruptcy case.

Laura Boudreau and Ada González-Torres on Detecting Harassment

Laura Boudreau, assistant professor of economics at the Columbia University Graduate School of Business, and Ada González-Torres, assistant professor of economics at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, join the Business Scholarship Podcast to discuss their paper Monitoring Harassment in Organizations, which they co-authored with Sylvain Chassang of Princeton University and Rachel Heath of the University of Washington. In this paper the authors use a randomized control trial to demonstrate survey methods for detecting harassment and other interpersonal misconduct in the workplace.

Guha Krishnamurthi on Caste Discrimination

Guha Krishnamurthi, associate professor of law at the University of Maryland, joins the Business Scholarship Podcast to discuss his essay Title VII and Caste Discrimination, which he co-authored with Charanya Krishnaswami. The essay introduces the South Asian caste system and analyzes the experience of caste discrimination in U.S. workplaces, along with remedies against caste discrimination under existing and new federal and state legislation.

Lindsey Gallo & Kendall Lynch on Corporate Monitors

Lindsey Gallo, assistant professor of accounting at the University of Michigan, and Kendall Lynch, an accounting PhD candidate at the University of Michigan, join the Business Scholarship Podcast to discuss their article Out of Site, Out of Mind? The Role of the Government-Appointed Corporate Monitor. In this article, Gallo, Lynch, and co-author Rimmy Tomy find that post-enforcement corporate monitorships are associated with reductions in law violations during a monitor’s tenure but that those reductions may not persist after the monitorship.

Todd Phillips on the MQD at the SEC

Todd Phillips, assistant professor at Georgia State University’s Robinson College of Business, joins the Business Scholarship Podcast to discuss his article The Major Questions Doctrine’s Domain, which he co-authored with Beau Baumann of Yale University. In this article, Phillips and Baumann explain that the Supreme Court’s novel Major-Questions Doctrine does not apply in cases in which executive agencies bring judicial enforcement actions or seek to apply judicial precedent. In making their case, they use challenges to the Securities and Exchange Commission’s crypto enforcement actions as a case study.

Helen Norton on Securities Regulation and Free Speech

Helen Norton, professor of law at the University of Colorado, joins the Business Scholarship Podcast to discuss her article What 21st-Century Free Speech Law Means for Securities Regulation. In her article Norton examines the deregulatory turn in the Supreme Court’s First Amendment jurisprudence and argues that that turn should not affect the longstanding functioning of the nation’s securities laws.

Sneha Pandya on Creditor Violence

Sneha Pandya, a federal law clerk, joins the Business Scholarship Podcast to discuss her article Debt Textualism and Creditor-on-Creditor Violence: A Modest Plea to Keep the Faith, which was co-authored with Eric Talley of Columbia University. In this article, Pandya and her co-author track recent acrimony in the corporate-debt markets and consider how judicial interpretation of debt contracts might mitigate or exacerbate creditor-on-creditor conflict.

Joseph Borg on State Securities Regulation

In this two-episode interview, Benjamin Edwards, associate professor of law at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, joins as guest co-host.

Part I

Joseph Borg, who recently retired from three decades as director of the Alabama Securities Commission, joins the Business Scholarship Podcast to discuss his career as a state securities regulator. Topics in this first part of a two-episode interview include agency building and administrative structure, state politics and financial regulation, cooperation between state and federal enforcement agencies, memorable enforcement actions, and insights on crypto enforcement by state securities regulators.

Part II

Joseph Borg, who recently retired from three decades as director of the Alabama Securities Commission, joins the Business Scholarship Podcast to discuss his career as a state securities regulator. Topics in this second part of a two-episode interview include public service in securities regulation; cooperation between state regulators, FINRA, and the SEC; and agency funding and resources.